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Double Poling

Double Poling

Double poling is a technique used in cross country skiing where the skier uses two poles simultaneously to propel themselves forward. The poles are planted alternately on either side of the body and the arms are used to drive the poles forward. This technique is used primarily on flat or uphill terrain, as it is an efficient way to generate forward momentum without having to stride with skis. Double poling requires a lot of upper body strength and coordination and is considered a highly technical aspect of cross country skiing. Is it faster than striding? It depends on the terrain and the skier’s personal abilities. In general, double poling is faster than striding on flat or uphill terrain as it provides a more efficient way of generating forward momentum. Striding, on the other hand, is better suited for downhill terrain as it provides better control and balance. Both techniques have their advantages and disadvantages and skiers often switch between them depending on the terrain and the situation. Ultimately, the fastest technique for an individual skier depends on their specific strengths and weaknesses, as well as the conditions of the race. Here’s a fantastic, very thorough paper on the topic writen by Jørgen Danielsen from The Norwegian University of Science and Technology  
How to Treat Frostbite

How to Treat Frostbite

Frostbite is treated by rewarming the affected tissue. This should be done slowly, as rapid rewarming can cause tissue damage. The affected area should be immersed in water that is between 104 and 108 degrees Fahrenheit. Pain medication may be given to help manage the discomfort associated with rewarming. After rewarming, the affected area should be kept elevated to help reduce swelling. If blisters or other skin damage occurs, they should be treated to prevent infection. In severe cases, surgery may be required to remove dead tissue. It is important to seek medical attention as soon as possible if you suspect you have frostbite.

Johannes Høsflot Klæbo – The GOAT

Johannes Høsflot Klæbo – The GOAT

Johannes Høsflot Klæbo is the GOAT in cross-country skiing. Here are some of his notable statistics:

-3-time overall World Cup champion (2018-19, 2019-20, 2020-21)

-7-time World Champion

-2-time Olympic medalist (1 gold, 1 silver)

-20 World Cup wins

-15 World Cup podium finishes

-26 World Cup top-ten finishes

-5 Tour de Ski podium finishes

-Youngest skier to win the overall World Cup

-Youngest skier to win the sprint World Cup title

https://www.fis-ski.com/DB/general/athlete-biography.html?sectorcode=CC&competitorid=184205&type=career

What’s the Difference Between v1 and v2 Skate Ski Technique?

V1 and V2 are different techniques used in cross-country skiing, specifically in the skate skiing style. V1 is a diagonal technique, where the skier pushes off with one ski while the other ski glides forward. The skier then alternates the pushing leg with each stride. V2 is a double poling technique, where the skier pushes off with both skis simultaneously while also using their poles for propulsion. V2 is considered to be more efficient than V1 and is typically used on flatter or uphill terrain.

Nordic Lab has a great video showing the differences: Nordic Ski Lab – Skate Skiing Techniques Explained

Tip: Waxing Cross Country Skis

Tip: Waxing Cross Country Skis

Here are some tips on waxing cross country skis:

  • Start by cleaning the skis thoroughly, removing any dirt or debris with a ski brush or scraper.
  • Select the appropriate wax for the current snow conditions. Warmer temperatures and wetter snow typically call for a softer, more flexible wax, while colder temperatures and drier snow require a harder, more durable wax.
  • Apply the wax to the skis using a wax iron, being careful not to overheat the skis. Move the iron in a slow, steady back-and-forth motion to evenly distribute the wax.
  • Allow the wax to cool and harden for a few minutes before using a plastic scraper to remove any excess wax.
  • Use a nylon or horsehair brush to polish the skis, creating a smooth surface that will glide more efficiently on the snow.
  • Repeat the process as necessary, depending on the snow conditions and how often you use your skis.
  • Finally, don’t forget to wax the tips and tails, they are important to protect the ski from damage and prolong the life of the ski.

It is recommended to get yourself a good quality wax iron and waxes, a good brush and scraper. It is also recommended to learn how to do the process on your own or at least understand the process, to make sure you have the best wax for the snow condition at the time of use.

Kami Rita is a Machine!

What else do you call someone who peaks Everest 26 times?

https://www.npr.org/2022/05/08/1097485283/nepali-climber-climbed-everest-for-the-26th-time-world-record

I still don’t think much of the rich tourists who blow a hundred grand to say they did it, but Kami is legit.

1994 : Summited on 13 May, via S Col – SE Ridge as High Altitude Worker
1995 : Reached up to 8500m as High Altitude Worker
1997 : Summited on 25 May, via S Col – SE Ridge as Climber
1998 : Summited on 25 May, via S Col – SE Ridge as High Altitude Worker
1999 : Summited on 13 May, via S Col – SE Ridge as High Altitude Worker
2000 : Summited on 23 May, via S Col – SE Ridge as High Altitude Worker
2002 : Summited on 25 May, via S Col – SE Ridge as High Altitude Worker
2003 : Summited on 30 May, via S Col – SE Ridge as High Altitude Worker
2004 : Summited on 24 May, via S Col – SE Ridge as High Altitude Worker
2005 : Summited on 30 May, via S Col – SE Ridge as High Altitude Worker
2006 : Summited on 20 May, via S Col – SE Ridge as High Altitude Worker
2007 : Summited on 22 May, via S Col – SE Ridge as High Altitude Worker
2008 : Summited on 24 May, via S Col – SE Ridge as High Altitude Worker
2009 : Summited on 5 May (Rope fixing team) and 23 May, via S Col – SE Ridge as High Altitude Worker
2010 : Summited on 5 May (Rope fixing team) and 24 May, via S Col – SE Ridge as High Altitude Worker
2012 : Summited on 18 May, via S Col – SE Ridge as High Altitude Worker
2013 : Summited on 10 May (Rope fixing team) and 22 May, via S Col – SE Ridge as High Altitude Worker
2015 : No summit bid due to the Earthquake
2016 : Summited on 20 May, via N Col – NE Ridge as High Altitude Worker
2017 : Summited on 27 May, via S Col – SE Ridge as High Altitude Worker
2018 : Summited on 16 May, via S Col – SE Ridge
2019 : Summited on 15 May, via S Col – SE Ridge
2019 : Summited on 21 May, via S Col – SE Ridge
2021: Summited on 7 May, via S Col – SE Ridge
2022: Summited on 7 May, via S Col – SE Ridge